David Schaich

AEC Institute for Theoretical Physics                          
University of Bern
3012 Bern, Switzerland
+41 31 631 8878 (Office)
+1 315 415-3277 (Google)
Skype: daschaich

Curriculum Vitae (last modified 28 November 2018)

Biography

I am a postdoctoral researcher in theoretical particle physics at the University of Bern. In 2019 I will join the faculty of the University of Liverpool. I previously worked at Syracuse University (2013–2016) and the University of Colorado Boulder (2011–2013) after studying at Amherst College and completing my PhD at Boston University. I have worked for shorter periods at the International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Bangalore (2018); the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Santa Barbara (2016 & 2015); the Humboldt University of Berlin (2015); the Aspen Center for Physics (2015 & 2013); the National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Taipei (2011); Lawrence Livermore National Lab (2010); and CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (2005). In addition to these institutions I have been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. National Science Foundation, and the National Science Council of Taiwan.

Research [complete overview, GitHub]

I use high-performance computing to gain insight into strongly interacting quantum field theories, primarily in the context of high-energy particle physics. I employ lattice field theory, a non-perturbative framework that enables first-principles investigations of strongly coupled systems. Making use of lattice regularization as a broadly applicable tool, I address questions that are important both theoretically and phenomenologically, within and beyond the standard model of particle physics.

My work currently focuses on quantum chromodynamics at non-zero baryon density, supersymmetric lattice field theories and composite Higgs models.

A central aspect of my research is the development and deployment of software for high-performance parallel computing. I do the bulk of my code development publicly through GitHub, and whenever possible I release my programs under open-source free software licenses such as the GNU General Public License.

In order both to contribute to public engagement with science and to recognize taxpayer support of my work over the years, I write non-technical (or at least less-technical) descriptions of my research projects for interested non-experts. This more technical summary of my current research provides more concise information for experts.

Teaching [complete list]

I most recently taught a graduate course on New strong dynamics beyond the standard model in Fall 2017. Some resources from this course are here. I previously organized informal courses on Advanced quantum field theory, at the University of Colorado during 2012–2013 (resources here) and at Syracuse University during 2013–2014 (resources here). Some of the online resources, in particular solutions to textbook exercises, are password protected.

Recent publications and preprints [complete list, INSPIRE, arXiv, Google]

Refereed journal articles

  1. Linear Sigma EFT for Nearly Conformal Gauge Theories
    LSD Collaboration: Thomas Appelquist, Richard C. Brower, George T. Fleming, Andrew Gasbarro, Anna Hasenfratz, James Ingoldby, Joe Kiskis, James C. Osborn, Claudio Rebbi, Enrico Rinaldi, David Schaich, Pavlos Vranas, Evan Weinberg and Oliver Witzel
    Physical Review D (2018, in press, Editors' Suggestion) [arXiv:1809.02624, INSPIRE]

  2. SO(4) invariant Higgs-Yukawa model with reduced staggered fermions
    Nouman Butt, Simon Catterall and David Schaich
    Submitted to Physical Review D (2018) [arXiv:1810.06117, INSPIRE]

  3. Nonpeturbative investigations of SU(3) gauge theory with eight dynamical flavors
    LSD Collaboration: Thomas Appelquist, Richard C. Brower, George T. Fleming, Andrew Gasbarro, Anna Hasenfratz, Xiao-Yong Jin, Ethan T. Neil, James C. Osborn, Claudio Rebbi, Enrico Rinaldi, David Schaich, Pavlos Vranas, Evan Weinberg and Oliver Witzel
    Submitted to Physical Review D (2018) [arXiv:1807.08411, INSPIRE]

  4. Solution of the sign problem in the Potts model at fixed fermion number
    Andrei Alexandru, Georg Bergner, David Schaich and Urs Wenger
    Physical Review D 97:114503 (2018) [arXiv:1712.07585, INSPIRE]

  5. Testing holography using lattice super-Yang–Mills on a 2-torus
    Simon Catterall, Raghav G. Jha, David Schaich and Toby Wiseman
    Physical Review D 97:086020 (2018) [arXiv:1709.07025, INSPIRE]

  6. Nonperturbative beta function of twelve-flavor SU(3) gauge theory
    Anna Hasenfratz and David Schaich
    Journal of High Energy Physics 1802:132 (2018) [arXiv:1610.10004, INSPIRE]

  7. Novel phases in strongly coupled four-fermion theories
    Simon Catterall and David Schaich
    Physical Review D 96:034506 (2017) [arXiv:1609.08541, INSPIRE]

  8. Strongly interacting dynamics and the search for new physics at the LHC
    LSD Collaboration: Thomas Appelquist, Richard C. Brower, George T. Fleming, Anna Hasenfratz, Xiao-Yong Jin, Joe Kiskis, Ethan T. Neil, James C. Osborn, Claudio Rebbi, Enrico Rinaldi, David Schaich, Pavlos Vranas, Evan Weinberg, Oliver Witzel
    Physical Review D 93:114514 (2016) [arXiv:1601.04027, INSPIRE]

  9. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability
    LSD Collaboration: Thomas Appelquist, Evan Berkowitz, Richard C. Brower, Michael I. Buchoff, George T. Fleming, Xiao-Yong Jin, Joe Kiskis, Graham D. Kribs, Ethan T. Neil, James C. Osborn, Claudio Rebbi, Enrico Rinaldi, David Schaich, Chris Schroeder, Sergey Syritsyn, Pavlos Vranas, Evan Weinberg and Oliver Witzel
    Physical Review Letters 115:171803 (2015, Editors' Suggestion) [arXiv:1503.04205, INSPIRE]

Conference proceedings

  1. Progress and prospects of lattice supersymmetry
    David Schaich
    Submitted to Proceedings of Science (2018) [arXiv:1810.09282, INSPIRE]

  2. Testing the holographic principle using lattice simulations
    Raghav G. Jha, Simon Catterall, David Schaich and Toby Wiseman
    European Physical Journal Web of Conferences 175:08004 (2018) [arXiv:1710.06398, INSPIRE]

  3. Phases of a strongly coupled four-fermion theory
    David Schaich and Simon Catterall
    European Physical Journal Web of Conferences 175:03004 (2018) [arXiv:1710.08137, INSPIRE]

Recent presentations [complete list, map]

Invited talks

  1. Lattice studies of maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theories, University of Liverpool Theoretical Physics Seminar, 28 November 2018

  2. Maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills on the lattice, Swansea University Theory Seminar, 23 November 2018]

  3. Composite dark matter and the role of lattice field theory, University of Stavanger Physics Seminar, 1 November 2018

  4. Lattice N=4 Supersymmetric Yang–Mills, Workshop on Quantum Gravity meets Lattice QFT, ECT* Trento, 5 September 2018

  5. Progress and prospects of lattice supersymmetry, Lattice 2018, Michigan State University, 24 July 2018

  6. Physics Out Of The Box: The Impact of Lattice Field Theory, University of Liverpool, 5 July 2018

  7. Lattice studies of maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theories, CERN Lattice Seminar, 7 June 2018

  8. Physics Out Of The Box: Frontiers of Lattice Field Theory, Florida International University, 9 March 2018

  9. Lattice N=4 Supersymmetric Yang–Mills, Program on Nonperturbative and Numerical Approaches to Quantum Gravity, String Theory and Holography, International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Bangalore, 31 January 2018 [recording]

Contributed talks

  1. Lower-dimensional lattice supersymmetry, University of Bern AEC Institute for Theoretical Physics lunch seminar, 22 March 2018

  2. Phases of a strongly coupled four-fermion theory, Lattice 2017, Granada, Spain, 22 June 2017

  3. Light scalar from lattice strong dynamics, 637th Wilhelm und Else Heraeus-Seminar "Understanding the LHC", Bad Honnef, Germany, 14 February 2017



Last modified 28 November 2018

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